Dr. Sebastiano Venturi
investigator on Iodine Deficiency Disorders
and Iodine metabolism

-Iodine in biology
-Extrathyroidal iodine
-Gastric cancer
-Atrophic gastritis
-Breast cancer
-Goitre
-Salivary Glands
-Oral Health
-Immunity
-Iodine metabolism
-Iodide as an antioxidant
-Iodine-prophylaxis
-Cretinism
-Neuropsycological Pathologies
-Evolution
-Evolution of Dietary Antioxidants
-Vitamin C in Evolution
-Selenium: Evolution in Biology

Dr. Sebastiano Venturi
via Tre Genghe n. 2;  47864
PENNABILLI (RN) ;  (Italy)

Tel : (+39) 0541 928205.

E-mail :
venturi.sebastiano@gmail.com

C.V.

Updated November 30, 2011

Sebastiano Venturi

IODIO ed EVOLUZIONE

Sebastiano Venturi § , Loris Grossi*, Gian Angelo Marra **, Mattia Venturi, Alessandro Venturi

Servizio di Igiene e Sanità Pubblica di Pennabilli, e Dipartimento di Medicina* e di Chirurgia** dell’ Ospedale Civile di Novafeltria , ASL n. 1 (Pesaro) - Regione Marche.

§ Relazione presentata dal Dr. S. Venturi al Convegno Internazionale "IODIO e CANCRO DELLA MAMMELLA" tenutosi a San Leo (Pesaro-Urbino), il 26 Ottobre 2002.

Pubblicato on-line: 8 Febbraio 2004 su DIMI-MARCHE NEWS
www.dimi.marche.it/



English summary of

" Iodine and Evolution "

Published in Italian on-line: February 8, 2004, su DIMI-MARCHE NEWS del
Dipartimento Interaziendale di Medicina Interna della Regione Marche
www.dimi.marche.it/

Dr. Sebastiano Venturi - via Tre Genghe n.2; 61016 PENNABILLI (PU), Italy
Tel : (+39) 0541 928205 ; E-mail: venturi.sebastiano@gmail.com

SUMMARY
The authors report their hypothesis on the antioxidant role of iodine in the evolution of life on the earth. Iodine is the most electron rich of the essential elements in the animal diet, and as iodide (I-) enters in the cells by an iodide transporter. Iodide, which acts as primitive electron donor by peroxidase enzymes, seems to have an ancestral antioxidant function in all iodide-concentrating cells from primitive marine algae to more recent terrestrial vertebrates. Thyroxine and iodothyronines seem also to have an antioxidant activity, by deiodinase enzymes, which are donors of iodides and indirectly of electrons. Thyroid cells phylogenetically derived from primitive gastroenteric cells, which during evolution, migrated and specialized in uptake and storage iodine-compounds in the new follicle, as reservoir of iodine, for a better adaptation of modern vertebrates to iodine deficient terrestrial environment.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

INTRODUCTION

Iodine (I) is the most electron rich of the essential elements in the animal diet, and as iodide
(I-) enters in the cells. Inorganic iodide is necessary for all living cells, but only the vertebrates have a thyroid gland and its iodinated hormones. In humans, the total amount of iodine is about 25-50 mg and about 60-70 % of total iodine is non-hormonal which is concentrated in non-follicular extrathyroidal tissues, where its biological role is still unknown. Sodium iodide symporter (NIS) of iodide pump, which was in 1996 genetically characterised and cloned (1, 2), is a transmembrane protein which actively transports iodide into the cells. Extrathyroidal NIS, more primitive than the thyroidal one, have a lower affinity for iodide and does not respond to more evolute TSH (Thyrotropin). We believe that the mechanism of iodide-pump (and NIS) is very ancient in the cells, and for this reason, there is a rather surprising lack of specificity for the anions. The pump is not able to distinguish iodide from other anions of similar atomic or molecular size, which may act as pseudo-iodides: thiocyanate, cyanate, nitrate, pertechnetate, perchlorate, etc. On the contrary, this pump is partially able to defend itself and the cell from toxic I-excess (Wolff-Chaikoff effect) (3, 4).


IODINE AND EVOLUTION

Over three billion years ago, blue-green algae (Cyanobacteria), which are the most primitive oxygenic photosynthetic organisms, ancestors of multicellular eukaryotic algae that contain the highest amount of iodine (1-4 % of dry weight) and peroxidase enzymes, were the first living cells to produce poisonous oxygen in the atmosphere (5, 6, 7). Therefore algal cells required a protective antioxidant action in which iodides with peroxidase seem to have had this specific role (8, 9, 10). In fact iodides are greatly present and available in sea-waters, where algal phytoplankton, the basis of marine food-chain, acts as a biological accumulator of iodides, selenium (and n-3 fatty acids). The sea is rich in iodine, about 60 micrograms (ug) per litre, since this is where most of the iodine removed and washed away from the soil accumulated by the glaciations ages.
The family of peroxidase enzymes includes mammal, mi-croorganism, plant, algal, and fungal peroxidases. Some of these peroxidases, known as haloperoxidases, use halide ions (iodide, bromide, and chloride) as natural electron donors, and have an antioxidant function in Cyanobac-teria (6, 7). Taurog (11) reported that the relation between animal and nonanimal peroxidases probably rep-resents an example of convergent evolution to a common en-zymatic mechanism. In 1985, we have hypothesized that iodide might have an ancestral antioxidant function in all iodide-concentrating cells from primitive marine algae to more recent terrestrial vertebrates (8). In these cells iodide acts as an electron donor in the presence of hydrogen peroxide ( H2O2) and peroxidase, and the remaining iodine atom readily iodinates tyrosine, histidine or certain specific lipids.
In fact:

2 I- à I2 + 2 e- (electrons) = - 0.54 Volt ;

2 I- + Peroxidase + H2O2 + 2 Tyrosine à 2 Iodo-Tyrosine + H2O + 2 e- (antioxidants);

2 e- + H2O2 + 2 H+ (of intracellular water-solution) à 2 H2O

Recently our hypothesis has experimentally been confirmed in some algae by a study carried out by Kuepper et al. (12). In fact marine algae, which produce about 80 % of atmospheric oxygen, are able, by haloperoxidase enzymes, to catalyze iodide (I-) incorporation into carbon metabolites producing iodo-methane gas (CH3I) and other halocarbons in the atmosphere. Pedersén et al.(13) believe that this production is a result of the development of photosynthesis and oxygen production and respiration, some 3 billion years ago, and that production of halocarbons by algae is due to an adaptation to light in order to reduce the amount of poisonous active oxygen species, such as hydrogen peroxide, superoxide radicals and hydroxyl radicals. The formation of halocarbons takes place also in darkness, which supports our hypothesis, since hydrogen peroxide is produced during respiration and by some oxidases. The defence system that has developed in the algae is an enzymatic removal system, built on peroxidases and catalases. We believe that the production of these iodo-compounds (Iodo-Tyrosine, Iodo-Histidine, Iodo-Lipids, Iodo-Carbons) was probably one of the most ancient mechanisms of defense from primitive poisonous reactive oxygen species.
Isolated cells of some extrathyroidal I-concentrating tissues could produce "in vitro" protein-bound mono-iodo-tyrosine (MIT), di-iodo-tyrosine (DIT) and probably some iodolipids (14). In recent times a second pathway for iodine organification has been described, which involves iodine incorporation into specific lipid molecules. Iodine can react with double bonds of some polyunsaturated fatty acids of cellular membranes, making them less reactive to free oxygen radicals (15). Iodolipids have been shown to be regulators of cellular metabolism. In particular delta-iodolactone (6-iodo-5-hydroxy-eicosatrienoic acid) has been found to be a potent inhibitor of proliferation of thyroid and probably of some non-thyroidal cells ( 16, 17, 18).
Selenium is present in cellular peroxidases and deiodinases, which are able to extract electrons from iodides, and the latter iodides from iodothyronines.


NONTHYROIDAL IODIDE-CONCENTRATING ORGANISMS

Iodide uptake is present in algae, plants, Porifera, Anto-zoa, and arthropods without showing any hormonal or biological action. Since approximately 700 million years ago (m/y/a) thyroxine (T4) has been present in fibrous exoskeletal scleroproteins of the lowest invertebrates (sponges and corals) (19). In water the iodine concentration decreases step by step from sea water (about 60 ug/L) to estuary and source of rivers (from 5 to 0.2 ug/L), and in parallel, salt-water fish (herring) con-tain about 500-800 ug of iodine per kilogram compared to fresh-water trout about 20 ug/kg (5). In I-deficient fresh-waters some trout and other salmonids (anadromous migra-tory fishes) suffer thyroid hypertrophy and metabolic I-deficiency disorders and moreover, higher infective, parasitic, atherosclerotic and neoplastic diseases than marine fishes. Farrell et al. reported the absence of coronary arterial lesions in some elasmobranch fishes, living in iodine-rich sea-water. The discovery that coronary arteriosclerotic lesions are a fact of life for migratory fresh-water salmon and yet appear to be absent in marine sharks raises fundamental questions regarding the etiology of coronary arteriosclerosis (20).
The European study on nutrition and cancer (EPIC) in 2001 and our recent studies (15, 21) reported that the consumption of marine fish reduce the risk of some human cancer. In some anadromous migratory fishes (sea lamprey and salmonids), iodine and thyroid hormones play a role in initiation of metamorphosis. In the amphibians, environmental iodine (via endogenous thyroxine) is the essential metamorphosis factor of aquatic tadpole into a more evolute terrestrial frog.
When adult marine migratory fishes (in-explicably) die in fresh-water after reproducing, they release their iodides and selenium (and n-3 fatty acids) in the environment, bringing back from the sea to iodine-deficient areas a consider-able quantity of these trace-elements, which are very useful for life and health of native animals. Marine fish and thyroid gland have the highest concentra-tion of selenium and iodine. Thyroid cells phylogenetically derived from primitive gastroenteric cells, which were able to form iodo-tyrosines and, during evolution, migrated and specialized in uptake and storage iodine-compounds in a new follicular structure.
Since 400-500 m/y/a, some primitive marine fishes started to emerge from the iodine-rich sea and transferred to iodine-deficient fresh-waters; and since 300-400 m/y/a, amphibians after metamorphosis, and reptiles started to live in I-deficient land. Therefore their diet became iodine deficient. Moreover the new terrestrial diet harboured vegetable iodide-transport inhibitors such as, thiocyanates, cyanates, nitrates and some glycosides (3, 4). In fact many substances that inhibit iodide-transport (as metabolic inhibitors, transport inhibitors and competitive anions) are vegetable and seem to have an antiparasitic activity (3).
At that time there was a remarkable crisis caused by deficiency of iodine and other marine essential trace-elements in terrestrial organisms.

Therefore firstly, the vegetable organisms started to optimize and produce alterative antioxidants as polyfenols, ascorbic acid, carotenoids, tocoferols, etc, some of whom became essential "vitamins" for humans (vitamins C, A, E, etc.).

Secondly, the animal organisms (the primitive chordates) started to use the new thyroid follicles, as reservoir of iodine and to use the thyroxine (not antagonized by iodide-inhibitors) in order to transport antioxidant iodides and triiodothyronine (T3) into the peripherical cells. T3, the biologically active form of the hormone in higher animals, became active in the metamorphosis and thermogenesis for a better adaptation to terrestrial fresh-waters, atmosphere, gravity, temperature and diet. The new hormonal action was made possible by the formation of T3-receptors in the cells of vertebrates. First, about 500 m/y/a, in primitive chordates, the alpha-T3-receptors with a meta-morphosing action appeared and then, about 250-350 m/y/a, in the birds and mammalians, the beta-T3-receptors with metabolic and thermogenetic actions were formed. During human embryogenesis alpha-T3-receptor genes are expressed before the beta-T3-receptors.
T4, reverse-T3 and iodothyronines became, as antioxidants and inhibitors of lipid peroxidation, more effective than vitamin E, glutathione and ascorbic acid (22, 23). Antioxidant action of iodides has also been described in brain cells of rats (24) and in the therapy of some human chronic diseases of cardiovascular and articular systems (25).

MAMMALIAN EXTRATHYROIDAL IODIDE-CONCENTRATING ORGANS

In the mammalians, several extrathyroidal non-follicular organs share the same gene expression of NIS and particularly stomach mucosa and lactating mammary gland (26, 27). Salivary glands, thymus, epidermis, choroid plexus and articular, arterial and skeletal systems (4) have iodide-concentrating ability too. But what role does iodide play in these animal cells? We may chronologically differentiate on the basis of the phylogenesis and embryogenesis three ways of action of iodine :

1) an ancient and direct action, on endodermal fore-gut and stomach and on ectodermal epidermis, where inorganic iodides probably act as antioxidants;

2) a recent and similar direct action, on salivary and mammary glands, thymus, ovary and on nervous, arterial and skeletal systems;

3) a more recent and indirect action of the thyroid and its iodinated hormones, on all vertebrate cells, which makes use of specific organic iodine-compounds: thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3), which act in very small quantities and utilize T3-receptors. Indeed thyroid hormones contain less than 1/30 of total iodine amount.

We believe that all these actions of iodine may still take place into the cells of living mammalians.
In fact, Evans et al. (28) reported that 5 milligrams of potassium iodide (daily injected) acts as 0.25 micrograms of L-thyroxine in recovering the impaired functions of many organs of thyroidectomized rats. Furthermore Wolff (3) reported that two patients with goitre and hypothyroidism have been described in whom the ability to concentrate iodide was lost in the thyroid (and in gastric mucosa and salivary gland); both patients were treated with large doses of iodide alone: both responded well (regarding to growth, BMR, cholesterol, etc.). This suggest strongly that while iodides are always necessary, the thyroid hormones are not indispensable for living organisms. The thyroid gland, with a progressively more developed morphology, is an evolute or-gan and its function started and was improved from primi-tive Chordata to more recent marine and fresh-water fishes, Amphibia, reptiles, birds, and finally mammals in which the thyroidectomy and hypothyroidism might be considered, in a contrary way of metamorphosis, like a sort of phylogenetical and metabolical regression to a former stage of reptilian life. In fact, reptilian features seem to be restored in hypothyroid humans such as a dry, hair-less, scaly, cold skin and a general slowdown of metabolism, digestion, heart rate, nervous reflexes with lethargic cere-bration, hyperuricemia, and hypothermia.
Dobson suggested that Neanderthal man suffered I-deficiency disorders caused by inland environment or by a genetic difference of his thyroid compared to the thyroid of the modern Homo Sapiens (29). I-deficient humans, as endemic cretins, suffer physical, neurological, mental, immune and reproductive diseases. Iodine has surely favoured the progress and evolution of nervous system for a better adaptation to terrestrial environment. Food and Nutrition Board and Institute of Medicine (30) have reported that iodine seems also have an important action on the immune system. The high iodide-concentration of thymus explains this important role. We have reported a significant and reversible immune deficiency in our I-deficient population affected by high endemic goitre (31). According to current WHO statistics more than two billion people in the world live nowadays in I-deficient countries. Their urinary iodine excretion is less than 100 ug per day, while the RDA of iodine is 150-200 ug. In the same I-deficient territories, human and animal pathologies by I-deficiency frequently coexist in the mammals (in particular herbivores) and in reptiles, amphibians and fresh-water fishes too.

In conclusion, we believe that the evolutionary adaptation of terrestrial vertebrates to environmental iodine deficiency is still not finished yet, and most of humans need still a correct (30) dietary iodine supplementation. We believe also that the knowledge of trophic, antioxidant and apoptosis-inductor actions of iodide might be useful for helping to prevent some extrathyroidal cancers.
_______________________________________________________________

REFERENCES

1 . Dai G, Levy O, Carrasco N. Cloning and characterization of the thyroid iodide transporter.
Nature. 1996 Feb 1; 379 (6564):458-60.

2. Smanik PA, Liu Q, Furminger TL, Ryu K, Xing S, Mazzaferri EL, Jhiang SM. Cloning of the
human sodium lodide symporter. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 1996 Sep 13;226 (2):339-45.

3. Wolff J Transport of iodide and other anions in the thy-roid gland. Physiol Rev. 1964;
44:45-90.

4. Brown-Grant K . Extrathyroidal iodide concen-trating mechanisms. Physiol Rev .1961;
41:189-213.

5. Venturi S, Donati FM, Venturi A, Venturi M. Environmental iodine deficiency: A challenge
to the evolution of terrestrial life? Thyroid. 2000 Aug; 10 (8):727-9.

6. Obinger C, Regelsberger C, Strasser C, Burner U, Peschek CA Purification and
Characterization of a homodimeric catalase-peroxidase from the cyanobacterium
Anacystis nidulans. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 1997; 235 :545-552.

7. Obinger C, Regelsberger C, Strasser C, Peschek CA.. Scavenging of activated
oxygen species in cyanobacteria. 9th International Symposium on Phototrophic
Prokaryotes. 1997; Vi-enna, Austria p. 142.

8. Venturi S. Preliminari ad uno studio sui rapporti tra cancro gastrico e carenza alimentare
iodica: pros-pettive specifiche di prevenzione. 1985; ed. USL n.1, Regione Marche;
Novafeltria (PU).

9. Venturi S, Venturi A, Cimini D, Arduini C, Venturi M, Guidi A. A new hypothesis:
iodine and gastric cancer. Eur J Cancer Prevent. 1993; 2:17-23.

10. Venturi S, Venturi M Iodide, thyroid and stomach car-cinogenesis: Evolutionary story of
a primitive antioxidant? Eur J Endocrinol . 1999;140:371-372.

11. Taurog A. Molecular evolution of thyroid peroxidase. Biochimie.1999; 81:557-562.

12. Kuepper FC, Schweigert N, Ar Gall E, Legendre J-M, Vilter H, Kloareg B. Iodine uptake in
Laminariales involves extracellular, haloperoxidase-mediated oxidation of iodide. Planta
1998; 207 :163-171

13. Pedersén M, Collén J, Abrahamson J, Ekdahl A. Production of halocarbons from
seaweeds: an oxidative stress reaction? Sci Mar. 1996; 60 (Suppl. 1) :257-263

14. Banerjee RK, Bose AK, Chakraborty TK, De SK, Datta AG. Peroxidase-catalysed
iodotyrosine formation in dispersed cells of mouse extrathyroidal tissues. J Endocrinol 1985;
106 ,2 :159-65

15. Venturi S. Is there a role for iodine in breast diseases?. The Breast, 2001; 10 :379-382

16. Dugrillon A. Iodolactones and iodoaldehydes mediators of iodine in thyroid autoregulation.
Exp Clin Endocrinol Diabetes. 1996;104 Suppl 4:41-5.


17. Pisarev MA, Chazenbalk GD, Valsecchi RM, Burton G, Krawiec L, Monteagudo E, Juvenal
GJ, Boado RJ, Chester HA. Thyroid autoregulation. Inhibition of goiter growth and of cyclic
AMP formation in rat thyroid by iodinated derivatives of arachidonic acid. J Endocrinol
Invest 1988 Oct;11(9):669-74.

18. Cann SA, van Netten JP, van Netten C. Hypothesis: iodine, selenium and the development of
breast cancer. Cancer Causes Control 2000; 11(2):121-7

19. Roche J. Biochimie comparée des scléroprotéines iodées des Anthozoaires et des
Spongiaires. Experientia. 1952 ; 8:45-56.

20. Farrell AP , Davie P., Sparksman R. J. Fish Disease 1992; 15: 537-540

21. Venturi S, Donati FM, Venturi A, Venturi M, Grossi L, Guidi. Role of iodine in evolution
and carcinogenesis of thyroid, breast and stomach. Adv Clin Path. 2000 Jan; 4 (1):11-7

22. Tseng YL, Latham KR. Iodothyronines: oxidative deiodination by hemoglobin and
inhibition of lipid peroxidation . Lipids 1984; 19 :96-102

23. Oziol L, Faure P, Vergely C, Rochette L, Artur Y, Chomard P, Chomard P. In vitro free
radical scavenging capacity of thyroid hormones and structural analogues. J Endocrinol.
2001 Jul; 170 (1):197-206.

24. Katamine S, Hoshino N, Totsuka K, Suzuki M.. Effects of the long-term feeding of high-iodine
eggs on lipid metabolism and thyroid function in rats. J Nutr Sci Vitaminol. 1985 ; 31:339-53

25. Winkler R, Klieber M. Important results of about 45 years balneo-medical research in
Bad Hall. Wien Med Worchenschr. 1998; Suppl; 148 :3-11

26. Spitzweg C, loba W, Eisenmenger W, Heufeider AE. Analysis of human sodium
iodide symporter gene expres-sion in extrathyroidal tissues and cloning of its
comple-mentary deoxyribonucleic acid from salivary gland, mam-mary gland, and gastric
mucosa. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1998; 83:1746-1751.


27. Ullberg S, Ewaldsson B. Distribution of radio-iodine studied by whole-body
autoradiography. Acta Radiologica Therapy Physics Biology. 1964; 2:24-32.

28. Evans ES, Schooley RA, Evans AB, Jenkins CA, Taurog A. Biological evidence
for extrathyroidal thyroxine for-mation. Endocrinology. 1966; 78:983-1001.

29. Dobson J.E. The iodine factor in health and evolution. The Geographical Review. 1998;
88:1-28

30. Panel on Micronutrients, Food and Nutrition Board Institute of Medicine.
Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper,
Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc. Washington,
DC; National Academy Press, 2001

31. Marani L, Venturi S, Masala R. Role of iodine in delayed immune response.
Isr J Med Sci. 1985 Oct;21(10):864.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

IODIO ed EVOLUZIONE

Lo iodio (simbolo I; P.A. 126.9; N.A 53) è l’atomo più pesante e ricco di elettroni presente nel nostro corpo ed è un oligoelemento indispensabile nella dieta. Lo iodio (I) è scarsamente reperibile nella superficie terrestre, perché nel corso di milioni di anni è stato dilavato e trasportato dalla crosta terrestre verso il mare, il quale si è arricchito progressivamente di iodio, sotto forma di ioduri (I-) e di iodati.

FIG. 1. Ciclo geo-biologico dello iodio

Le acque del mare sono ricche di iodio, circa 50-60 microgrammi (ug) per litro, mentre le acque terrestri, fiumi, laghi ecc. ne contengono quantità da 10 a 200 volte inferiori ( 5 - 0.2 ug/L). Una piccola parte di iodio evapora nell’aria e precipita al suolo con le piogge, soprattutto in vicinanza delle zone costiere. La Fig. 1. rappresenta il ciclo geo-biologico dello iodio, che in parte è simile a quello del selenio. Lo iodio viene captato dalle cellule come ioduro (I-) tramite il NIS (Fig. 2) (sodium iodide symporter) che è il trasportatore proteico transmembrana dello ioduro, la cui molecola, nell’uomo, è stata recentemente (1996) clonata e caratterizzata da Dai e Smanik e coll.

Essendo presumibilmente molto antico, il NIS è poco specifico e secondo Wolff e Maurey non è in grado di distinguere lo ioduro da altri atomi o piccole molecole come i nitrati, i nitriti, i fluoruri, i tiocianati, i pertecnati ecc. aventi stessa carica elettrica e simili dimensioni atomiche o molecolari, i quali si comportano come "pseudo-ioduri"; al contrario la "pompa dello ioduro" e' capace di difendere se stessa e le cellule, a cui appartiene, dal tossico eccesso di iodio ( Wolff-Chaikoff effect).

 

FIG. 2. Il NIS (sodium iodide symporter) è il trasportatore proteico transmembrana dello ioduro è molto antico e poco specifico. La sua molecola, nell’uomo, è stata recentemente (1996) clonata e caratterizzata da Dai e da Smanik e coll.

La caratteristica elettrochimica dello iodio è quella di attirare e cedere facilmente un elettrone (con un potenziale redox di -0.54 Volt). Questa proprietà lo rende un efficiente trasportatore e donatore di elettroni, che è la caratteristica fondamentale delle sostanze antiossidanti.

Infatti:

2 I- à I2 + 2 e- (elettroni) = - 0.54 Volt ;

2 I- + Perossidasi + H2O2 + 2 Tirosina à 2 Iodio-Tirosina + H2O + 2 e- (antiossidanti) ;

2 e- + H2O2 + 2 H+ (della soluzione acquosa intracellulare) à 2 H2O

 

Le alghe marine sono in grado, tramite enzimi alo-perossidasici, di catalizzare l’incorporazione dello ioduro in alcuni idrocarburi producendo iodio-metano gassoso (CH3I) e altri alo-idrocarburi, nella atmosfera. Secondo Petersén e Kuepper e coll. questa produzione è il risultato della fotosintesi, della produzione di ossigeno e della respirazione, iniziate circa 3 miliardi di anni fa’; ed è dovuta allo scopo di ridurre il danno dei radicali liberi dell’ossigeno, come il perossido di idrogeno (H2O2), i superossidi ed i radicali ossidrilici.

Recentemente una altra via metabolica è stata descritta, tramite la quale lo ioduro viene incorporato negli acidi grassi poli-insaturi delle membrane cellulari, proteggendoli dalle perossidazioni. Sia le cellule tiroidee che quelle di altri tessuti I-captanti, come cellule della mucosa gastrica e delle ghiandole salivari, sono in grado di produrre "in vitro" mono-iodio-tirosina (MIT), di-iodio-tirosina (DIT) legate a proteine e alcuni iodio-lipidi. In particolare il delta-iodiolattone (acido 6-iodio-5-idrossi-eicosatrienoico) il quale è un potente inibitore della proliferazione delle cellule tiroidee and e secondo Cann e coll. gioca un ruolo nel controllo antiproliferativo dei tessuti extratiroidei I-concentranti.

Figura 3.
Iodio ed evoluzione
. Più di tre miliardi di anni fa’ le alghe verdi-azzurre furono le prime cellule procariote a produrre ossigeno (allora tossico) e iodio-metano nella atmosfera terrestre. Da circa 800-700 milioni di anni la tiroxina (T4) è presente nelle proteine dell’esoscheletro degli invertebrati marini (spugne, coralli, conchiglie ecc.) senza possedere alcuna conosciuta azione ormonale. Circa 500-400 milioni di anni fa’ alcuni primitivi pesci marini (le lamprede) iniziarono a risalire dal mare (ricco di iodio) le acque carenti dei fiumi. Circa 400-300 milioni di anni fa’ alcuni di questi vertebrati cominciarono ad evolvere in anfibi e poi in rettili, che popolarono l’ habitat terrestre I-carente. Questi vertebrati necessitarono pertanto di un nuovo efficiente serbatoio dove poter accumulare il minor iodio introdotto: il follicolo "tiroideo". Tali vertebrati cominciarono in seguito ad utilizzare la T4 come trasportatore nelle cellule periferiche dello ioduro antiossidante, ed in seguito utilizzarono la T3 ed i suoi recettori. La T3 divenne così l’ormone attivo nella metamorfosi e nella termogenesi, per un migliore adattamento al nuovo habitat terrestre.

Figure 3. IODINE AND EVOLUTION
Over three billion years ago, blue-green algae were the first living Prokaryota o produce oxygen in the atmosphere. About 700 million years ago (m/y/a) thyroxine (T4) is present in fibrous exoskeletal scleroproteins of the lowest invertebrates (sponges and corals) without showing any hormonal action. About 500-400 m/y/a some primitive marine fishes started to emerge from the iodine-rich sea (60 ug/L) and transferred to iodine-deficient fresh water (5-0.2 ug/L), and about 400-300 m/y/a these vertebrates evolved in amphibians and reptiles and transferred to I-deficient land. Therefore these vertebrates needed a new follicular organ: the thyroid gland, as reservoir of iodine. These vertebrates started to use its primitive T4 as transporter, into the peripherical cells, of antioxidant iodide and T3. The remaining T3 became the active hormone in the metamorphosis and thermogenesis for a better adaptation to terrestrial environment: fresh water, atmosphere, gravity, temperature and diet.

 

L’organismo umano contiene circa 25-50 milligrammi di iodio, di cui meno di 10-15 mg sono presenti nei follicoli della tiroide e meno di 1 mg negli ormoni tiroidei circolanti. La maggior parte, il 60-70 % di tutto lo iodio del corpo umano, è presente in sede extratiroidea e concentrato in diversi organi non-follicolari: stomaco, epidermide, mammella, ghiandole salivari, arterie, timo ecc. in cui sembra svolgere una azione diretta antiossidante, non ormonale, poco conosciuta. Tale azione, era già presente più di tre miliardi di anni fa nelle alghe verdi-azzurre (cianobatteri). Infatti queste alghe, ricche di iodio, furono le prime a produrre ossigeno, fino ad allora assente nella atmosfera terrestre. Per cui la cellula algale doveva possedere degli antiossidanti, efficaci e facilmente reperibili, per difendersi dalla tossicità dell’ossigeno. Gli ioduri, ed il selenio, diffusi e reperibili nelle acque marine, hanno avuto in ciò un ruolo determinante. Infatti il selenio è presente nelle perossidasi e nelle deiodasi intracellulari, le quali sono capaci di estrarre elettroni dagli ioduri, e queste ultime, gli ioduri dalle iodio-tironine. La vita nel nostro pianeta è iniziata nel mare circa 4 miliardi di anni fa’, ed per tre miliardi e mezzo di anni è stata esclusivamente marina, solo negli ultimi 300-500 milioni di anni fa’, alcuni esseri viventi, protetti dai raggi ultravioletti solari dallo scudo dell’ozono (O3), iniziarono ad emergere dalle acque marine e ad abitare la terraferma (carente di iodio): prima i vegetali poi gli animali.

Si creò allora una grave "crisi dello iodio": infatti mentre nel mare tutti gli esseri viventi, potevano utilizzare lo iodio ed il selenio, con il trasferimento sulla terraferma si è interrotta la catena alimentare nutrizionale marina che li trasferiva (insieme agli acidi grassi omega-3), dal fitoplancton fino al pesce.

I vegetali "terrestri" hanno superato questa crisi di antiossidanti "marini", sintetizzando e perfezionando
l' utilizzo di sostanze antiossidanti alternative come i polifenoli, i flavonoidi, l’acido ascorbico, i carotenoidi, i tocoferoli ecc. di cui alcune sono diventate, in seguito, fattori "vitaminici", essenziali per l’uomo, come le vitamine C, A, E ecc.

Gli animali terrestri invece, hanno cercato di migliorare ed di ottimizzare le scarse quantità di iodio disponibili sulla terraferma, mediante 3 meccanismi adattativi:

1) la creazione del follicolo tiroideo;

2) l’utilizzazione della T4 come trasportatore di ioduri;

3) la formazione dei recettori della T3:

 

FIG. 4. Metamorfosi dell’ammocete (larva di ciclostoma) in lampreda adulta, con neoformazione del follicolo "tiroideo" derivato dalle cellule gastriche della larva. La creazione del follicolo-deposito di iodio si è creata in preparazione della migrazione nelle acque dolci (iodo-carenti) dei fiumi terrestri ( da Magni M.A., 1985).

La somiglianza tra stomaco e tiroide è dovuta alla comune filogenesi ed embriogenesi. derivando dall’intestino primitivo, che è capace di captare iodio e formare composti iodati. Questo spiega le comuni caratteristiche tra cui: la polarità e i microvilli apicali, la capacità di captare e di secernere iodio, la secrezione di ormoni aminoacidici e di simili glicoproteine (tireoglobulina e mucina) e inoltre la capacità di digerire tramite peptidasi e di riassorbire (tireoglobulina e cibo) ed infine i comuni antigeni di membrana e le malattie immunologiche associate.

FIG. 5 . Meccanismo di azione della tiroxina (T4) nelle cellule periferiche. La T4, non è ostacolata dagli anioni monovalenti vegetali, ma ha un diverso e più moderno e specifico recettore. Questo nuovo modo di utilizzare gli ioduri si è integrato, senza sostituirlo, a quello più antico del simporter dello ioduro (NIS), che è rimasto presente e funzionante nelle cellule (vedi fig. 2).

1) La formazione del follicolo tiroideo, che origina dall’intestino I-captante primitivo, come efficiente forma di deposito dello iodio (iniziato nella lampreda prima di migrare nelle acque terrestri I-carenti). E’ proprio grazie al deposito-riserva di iodio nei follicoli tiroidei, che noi uomini possiamo vivere per molte settimane senza assumere iodio e senza avere sintomi clinici di carenza.

2) La T4 non è più, come gli ioduri, in competizione con gli anioni monovalenti vegetali "pseudo- ioduri", ma ha un diverso e più moderno e specifico recettore (Fig. 5). Infatti la dieta vegetale terrestre è ricca di antagonisti dello ioduro sul NIS come i nitrati, nitriti, tiocianati, cianati, glicosidi ecc. sviluppatisi come strategia di difesa antiparassitaria. Questo nuovo meccanismo si è integrato, senza sostituirlo, a quello più antico del simporter dello ioduro (NIS), che è rimasto sempre attivo, come si può vedere anche nelle I-scintigrafie total-body successive. La tiroxina, che prima veniva spesso secreta ed eliminata dalla cellula "marina", diventa così un trasportatore endocellulare dello ioduro molto più efficiente, come hanno dimostrato Evans e coll. Ricerche di Tseng e Latham e di Oziol e coll. hanno documentato inoltre un potere antiossidante ed inibitore della perossidazione lipidica della T4 e della rT3 (ma non della T3) superiore alle vitamine C ed E ed al glutatione; e Virgili e coll. hanno riportato che il trattamento con tiroxina protegge dai danni perossidativi intestinali indotti dalla carenza di zinco nei ratti. Infatti gli ioduri difendono le cellule cerebrali dai danni perossidativi nei ratti e sono stati utilizzati in molte malattie umane degenerative su base perossidativa come arteriosclerosi, vasculopatie, artrosi ecc. in numerosi studi clinici degli anni ’50 in Europa, in cui a differenza degli USA, non era allora praticata la iodioprofilassi. Recenti studi stanno oggi evidenziando le basi biochimiche della azione antiossidante degli ioduri (Winkler e coll). Secondo Kahaly e Hak e coll. lo iodio e la funzionalità tiroidea sono importanti nel metab olismo dei lipidi, del colesterolo e nel ridurre l’aterosclerosi (fig. 6) e l’ipertensione, mentre l’ipotiroidismo anche subclinico è oggi ritenuto causa importante di morbilità cardiovascolare.

3) Infine la formazione dei recettori nucleari e mitocondriali della T3, che hanno permesso un migliore adattamento dei vertebrati all’ambiente terrestre. Per cui le branchie si sono lentamente trasformate in polmoni e le pinne in arti; e per cui la maggiore gravità terrestre ha stimolato la ossificazione delle ossa degli arti e dello scheletro, sviluppando anche una azione calorigena a difesa dalle maggiori escursioni termiche terrestri.

 

La Fig. 6 La autoradiografia con I-131 nel ratto mostra la cospicua I-captazione della parete arteriosa della aorta, ben evidente anche dopo 5-14 giorni dalla iniezione del radioiodio, che potrebbe chiarire la sede della azione antiossidante ed antiaterosclerotica dello ioduro.

FIG. 7. Scintigrafie con I-123 total body sequenziali umane. La I-captazione in tutti i tessuti captanti è mediata dal NIS delle membrane cellulari ( Cortesia del Dr. G. Boni dell’Università di Pisa).

Nelle scintigrafie (Fig. 7) si notano oltre alla tiroide, altri tessuti iodiocaptanti: alla ventesima ora circa il 70 % dello radioiodio iniettato è presente in sede extratiroidea: nella mucosa gastrica, epidermide, plessi coroidei cerebrali, ghiandole salivari ed inoltre, qui non visibili, nel timo fetale e nelle ghiandole mammarie (solo in gravidanza ed allattamento). La tiroide capta in modo progressivo, mentre gli altri organi hanno un rapido accumulo ed una rapida dismissione del radioiodio. La I-captazione è dovuta alla azione dei rispettivi simporter dello ioduro (NIS), che pur essendo simili, nella tiroide è filogeneticamente ed embriologicamente più evoluto, infatti è più affine per lo ioduro e risponde allo stimolo del più modernoTSH. Ma solo la tiroide possiede il follicolo tiroideo che gli consente l’accumulo e il deposito di iodiocomposti (TG).

La iodiocaptazione tiroidea nel feto umano è infatti presente solo dalla 12° settimana di vita fetale e la formazione filogenetica della tiroide è anch’essa relativamente recente, risalendo a solo 400-500 milioni di anni fa’, quando i primi vertebrati marini cominciarono a popolare le acque dei fiumi terrestri carenti di iodio.

_______________________________________________________________________________

Le prossime figure documentano in breve la storia evolutiva dello iodio negli esseri viventi: dai più antichi come le alghe, gli invertebrati, i pesci, gli anfibi, i rettili ed ai più recenti i mammiferi fino all’ uomo moderno.

_______________________________________________________________________________

 

FIG. 8. Autoradiografia di alga Laminaria

 

FIG. 9. Ciclo dello iodio nelle alghe

Le alghe captano e trattengono gli ioduri in modo omogeneo e diffuso, le Laminarie contengono circa 1-4 % del peso secco di iodio. Le alghe marine (alghe verdi-azzurre) furono i primi esseri viventi a produrre ossigeno ( più di 3 miliardi di anni fa’), per cui hanno utilizzato efficaci e reperibili sistemi antiossidanti tra cui gli ioduri (Fig. 9) e il selenio ( Pedersén e Kuepper e Coll). Le alghe producono circa 80 % dell’ossigeno atmosferico, e costituiscono il primo anello della catena alimentare nutrizionale marina che trasferisce iodio, selenio e acidi grassi n-3 ai pesci e agli uomini. Le acque salso-bromo-iodiche delle sorgenti termali del nostro entroterra (Salsomaggiore, Abano, Castrocaro ecc.) derivano da enormi praterie di alghe che durante la formazione della penisola italiana (circa 20-30 milioni di anni fa’) sono state ricoperte e sollevate da altri strati geologici, mantenendone però gli elementi algali primitivi mineralizzati come lo iodio, il bromo, il sale, il metano ecc.

 

FIG. 10. (A sinistra) Autoradiografia di invertebrato, conchiglia .

Risalendo la scala evolutiva filogenetica, possiamo vedere, circa 800 milioni di anni fa’, la comparsa di una notevole iodocaptazione nell’esoscheletro della conchiglia, e anche delle spugne e dei coralli. Negli anni ’50, Roche aveva già dimostrato negli invertebrati la presenza di MIT, DIT e T4, che vengono secreti ed espulsi dalle cellule nell’esoscheletro, dopo aver ceduto l’elettrone dello ioduro.

FIG. 11. Autoradiografia di pesce di mare: platessa - sogliola

Circa 500 milioni di anni fa’ nei pesci marini è comparsa una iodiocaptazione generalizzata, con minimo accumulo tiroideo, poco necessario per la facile reperibilità di ioduri nel mare. I follicoli, qui non ancora "tiroidei", sono privi di capsula e si presentano scarsi e diffusi negli organi interni addominali. I pesci marini contengono alte quantità di iodio in gran parte inorganico circa 500-800 microgrammi (ug) per kg. Alcuni pesci marini migratori (anadromi) come le lamprede, i salmonidi ecc. risalgono dal mare i fiumi fino alle sorgenti, dove muoiono inspiegabilmente dopo essersi riprodotti. In questo modo tali pesci marini riportano nei territori I-carenti dell’interno notevoli quantità di iodio e di selenio ( e di omega-3), consentendo la vita ed il benessere di altre specie animali che, tramite loro, assimilano tali oligoelementi.

FIG. 12. Salmone di fiume che mostra tra le branchie alcuni grossi noduli (circoscritti) costituiti da follicoli tiroidei iperplastici come è documentato dal relativo quadro istologico Fig. 13.

 

FIG. 13. Quadro istologico di branchie di salmone di fiume. Si notano (indicati dalle frecce)dei follicoli tiroidei iperplastici immersi nel tessuto branchiale

 

Circa 400 milioni di anni fa’ quando, per la ricerca di cibo o per sfuggire ai predatori, alcune specie di pesci cominciano a lasciare il mare per abitare le acque dolci e I-carenti dei fiumi terrestri iniziano anche le malattie da carenza di iodio e di altre sostanze di origine marina. Nei pesci d’acqua dolce (in cui lo iodio è carente) i follicoli tiroidei sono più numerosi ed aggregati spesso tra le branchie; i cui tessuti contengono molto meno iodio rispetto ai pesci marini (circa 20 ug/ kg) ed è in gran parte iodio organico ( MIT, DIT , T4 ).

Nella Fig. 12 vediamo un salmone "gozzuto" di fiume che mostra tra le branchie alcuni grossi noduli "tiroidei", costituiti da follicoli iperplastici con cellule follicolari alte e cilindriche (Fig. 13). Questo quadro è assimilabile a quello del gozzo endemico multinodulare nell’uomo. Infatti queste patologie sono frequenti e associate sia nei pesci, nei mammiferi e negli uomini, nelle zone di endemia gozzigena. I pesci d’acqua dolce I-carenti presentano inoltre anche difetti della immunità e maggiori malattie infettive, parassitarie, tumorali ed aterosclerotiche ( Farrell ) dei pesci marini (in gran parte selaci).
Infatti i selaci e i pesci marini in genere soffrono molto più raramente di neoplasie. Ricordiamo a tale proposito che il più grande studio epidemiologico europeo EPIC sui rapporti tra dieta e cancro che si è concluso lo scorso anno (2001) ha documentato proprio l’utilità del pesce di mare nella prevenzione di alcune importanti patologie tumorali nell’uomo.

 

FIG. 14. Metamorfosi della rana ( circa 300-400 milioni di anni fa’ ).

 

 

FIG. 15. Metamorfosi della rana: da animale acquatico ( il girino) a rana terrestre. La quantità ambientale di iodio, necessario a formare la tiroxina endogena, innesca il meccanismo della metamorfosi.

Lo studio della azione dello iodio nello sviluppo e metamorfosi degli anfibi è importante e riassume la strategia evolutiva di adattamento degli animali acquatici (pesci) in animali terrestri. Gli anfibi hanno una vita larvale nell’acqua dolce ( non esistono anfibi marini !) ed una vita adulta "terrestre" da circa 370 milioni di anni fa’. E’ esclusivamente la quantità ambientale di iodio, che consente la formazione della tiroxina endogena, ad innescare il meccanismo della metamorfosi, adattando così gli anfibi adulti alla vita "terrestre"con la formazione di polmoni, di epidermide lubrificata, arti deambulanti ossificati e di idonea circolazione cardio-polmonare. Il girino carente di iodio non riesce a metamorfosare e muore presto come girino.

 

FIG. 16. Axolotl, larva acquatica di Ambystoma.


Nella Fig 16. vediamo un altro anfibio l’Ambystoma, una salamandra acquatica, un animale ben studiato nei laboratori di biologia e zoologia sperimentale per l’interessante fenomeno della neotenia: cioè la capacità di riprodursi anche allo stato larvale. Questo anfibio vive in genere in acque dolci iodiocarenti di alta montagna (Messico, Giappone ecc.) ed in relazione alla quantità di iodio presente nell’acqua, può vivere e riprodursi per tutta la sua vita come larva acquatica (axolotl) ( Fig. 16) oppure, se introduce abbastanza iodio per formare sufficienti quantità di tiroxina, come salamandra adulta terrestre (Figg. 17 e 18). Infatti se non c’è abbastanza iodio nell’ambiente l’axolotl non riesce a superare il salto evolutivo per trasformarsi in salamandra "terrestre".

FIG. 17. e FIG. 18. salamandre adulte terrestri.

 

 

FIG. 19. Scintigrafia di rettile (terrestre): lucertola.

Nella Fig. 19 vediamo la scintigrafia di un rettile, una lucertola (terrestre) che, circa 300 milioni di anni fa’, si è bene adattata alla terraferma, per cui presenta un efficiente accumulo e deposito follicolare tiroideo di iodio. E’ interessante notare anche la cospicua iodiocaptazione gastrica, ben evidente nei primi 2-3 giorni, la quale precede anche nella embriogenesi quella tiroidea.

 

FIG. 20. Evoluzione morfologica macroscopica della tiroide e dei suoi follicoli in vari animali

La Fig. 20. riassume l’evoluzione "morfologica" macroscopica dei follicoli della ghiandola tiroidea, i quali durante l’evoluzione ( dai pesci, anfibi, rettili, uccelli e mammiferi) diventano sempre più definiti, incapsulati ed organizzati nella tiroide in sede pretracheale

 

FIGURE. 21, 22, 23. I-131 autoradiografie in mammiferi: topi
Autoradiografie di Ullberg ed Ewaldsson, riprodotte per cortesia di Acta Radiologica)

FIG. 21.
Lo studio autoradiografico di Ullberg ed Ewaldsson è importante in quanto studia il comportamento dello iodio e del NIS in gravidanza, nella mammella ed in particolare nei tessuti fetali dei mammiferi risalenti a circa 200 milioni di anni fa’.

La Fig. 21 , dopo un solo minuto dall’iniezione endovenosa dello I-131, evidenzia la precocissima e rilevante captazione della mucosa gastrica e successivamente anche della ghiandola mammaria (Fig. 23) della topolina gravida , qui più evidenti della captazione tiroidea.


FIG. 22.

 

FIG. 23. Dopo un’ora si evidenziano anche le captazioni delle membrane e delle placente fetali e inoltre la precoce captazione della mucose gastriche e del timo e delle tiroidi dei feti. Ben visibile (a destra, in basso) la captazione della ghiandola mammaria della madre in gravidanza.

 

FIG. 24. I-131 autoradiografie sequenziali nel ratto.

La Fig. 24 mostra la forte I-captazione della mucosa gastrica, dalla quale lo iodio viene secreto nel succo gastrico e riversato nell’intestino, dove viene riassorbito e ricaptato anche dallo stomaco, oltre che dalla tiroide, creando così una circolazione (NIS mediata) entero-gastro-tiroidea dello iodio, che si perpetua fino ad eliminazione completa per via reno-vescicale. Quindi lo stomaco, più della tiroide, sembra avere un primitivo ruolo centrale nel metabolismo dello iodio su scala evolutiva. Dopo 5 giorni il radioiodio è ancora ben visibile nelle pareti della aorta, e dopo 14 giorni è visibile solamente nella tiroide, nell’aorta e nella pelliccia.

 

 

FIG. 25. Concentrazione del radioiodio nella mucosa gastrica di cavia. (Sopra) Le sezioni di mucosa gastrica colorate con eosina ed ematossilina. (Sotto) le autoradiografie: (a sinistra) con I- 131 e ( a destra) con tiocianato marcato. Da Logothetopoulos & Myant. ( Per cortesia di J. Physiology )

La FIG. 25. evidenzia che della mucosa gastrica la parte I-captante è costituita solo dalle cellule mucosecernenti della superficie e dei colletti delle ghiandole gastriche (Fig. 25, in basso), che costituiscono proprio quelle foveole gastriche da cui si originano i carcinomi gastrici.

Evans e coll. hanno dimostrato in ratte tiroidectomizzate che la tiroxina (T4) è molte volte piu’ efficace dello iodio inorganico (iniettato sottocute) nel ripristinare la normalità in molteplici funzioni fisiologiche, come la funzione ovaica (FIG. 26) e la crescita corporea, il metabolismo, il ritmo cardiaco, e le funzioni riproduttive, surrenali, timiche e ipofisarie. Inoltre Goethe e coll. hanno recentemente dimostrato che i recettori ormonali nucleari della T3 non sono indispensabili per la vita, e che probabilmente c'è una lora azione biochimica extra-recettoriale anche a livello mitocondriale.

FIG. 26.
0.25 ug /die di tiroxina (D) sono efficaci come 5 mg /die di ioduro inorganico iniettato sottocute (C ) nel ripristinare, in ratte tiroidectomizzate, la normalità (A) della funzione ovaica soppressa dalla tiroidectomia (B).

 

 

La Fig. 27. ci mostra un quadro della carenza iodica congenita nell’agnello nato da pecora carente di iodio (sopra), confrontato con l’agnello normale (sotto). Si notano danni (cerchiati) di alcuni organi iodio-captanti: l’epidermide con assenza del vello, lesioni osteo-scheletriche, microcefalia con riduzione delle cellule nervose cerebrali ed inoltre importanti deficit immunitari. Questo quadro è assimilabile a quello del cretinismo endemico nell’uomo delle Figg. 27 e 28. ( Da Hetzel, modificata )

 

Secondo i fisiologi, anche se importante, la ghiandola tiroidea non è indispensabile per la vita e gli effetti della sua asportazione si manifestano tardivamente, solo dopo 2-3 settimane. Mentre la T3 trasforma il girino acquatico nella rana terrestre più evoluta, la tiroidectomia e l’ipotiroidismo nei mammiferi sembrano costituire una sorta di "rettilizzazione", cioè quasi una regressione filogenetica allo stadio precedente di rettile, di cui vengono riacquistate alcune caratteristiche fisiche e metaboliche come: la pelle ispessita, secca, squamosa e con perdita di peli, e la digestione, i riflessi, il battito cardiaco rallentati, con riduzione di tutto il metabolismo, accumulo di lipidi, ipotermia ed infine iperuricemia metabolica.

 

FIG. 28. Bambino e FIG. 29. Adulto, affetti da cretinismo endemico (da Netter, modificate)

 

Nei primati e nei uomini di 1-2 milioni di anni fa’ la tiroide è ben organizzata e a forma di farfalla, in sede pretracheale, dove, come un rudimentale termostato, può meglio avvertire e rispondere alle variazioni termiche ambientali. Negli uomini affetti da cretinismo endemico da carenza iodica sono evidenti i danni fisici, neurologici, mentali, immunitari ( Marani e coll.) e riproduttivi. Nel 1998 su Geographical Review, Jerome Dobson ha ipotizzato che la scomparsa dell’uomo di Neanderthal avvenuta circa 35.000 anni fa’, sia stata favorita dalle maggiori capacità fisiche, intellettive e di adattamento dell’ homo sapiens   moderno dovute al maggiore intake iodico, grazie al miglioramento sia dietetico che genetico del NIS, divenuto più efficiente nel captare lo iodio. Infatti negli scheletri dell’uomo di Neanderthal, Dobson ha rilevato le stigmate ossee del cretinismo endemico, con arti corti e tozzi e microcefalia. A differenza del Neanderthal, l’ homo sapiens   moderno aveva habitat più vicino ai mari e dieta ricca di pesce. Lo iodio ha pertanto sicuramente favorito il processo di evoluzione, di encefalizzazione e di sviluppo dell’intelligenza degli esseri umani, permettendone così un migliore adattamento ambientale.

 

 

FIG. 30. Mappa mondiale delle aree di endemia di gozzo da carenza iodica (ombreggiate obliquamente) spesso circostanti a catene montuose (in blu), prima della effettuazione della iodio-profilassi nel mondo (da OMS, 1960).

Ancora oggi, più di tre miliardi di persone sulla terra vivono in aree distanti dal mare e con carenza ambientale di iodio (Fig. 30), e soffrono di tireopatie (in oltre la metà dei casi), di danni neurologici e somatici (in circa un quinto), con diminuzione delle difese immunitarie e della fertilità e danni alla prole. In questi territori coesistono tali patologie sia negli uomini che negli animali (enzoozie), specie negli erbivori, negli anfibi e nei pesci di acqua dolce. Tutto ciò fa’ supporre che il processo di adattamento evolutivo dei vertebrati terrestri alla carenza iodica ambientale non sia ancora terminato.

 

Map of the World's Iodine Nutrition (from ICCIDD, 2003)

 

 


Summary of the World's Iodine Nutrition (from ICCIDD, 2003)

Afr (SS)
Amer
As/Pac
E Eur/CA
China/FE

Mid E/N Afr

SE Asia
W/C Eur
Total
Population (millions)
633
835
662
287
1,309
514
1,269
580
6,089
Number of Countries
44
25
14
15
3
19
7
32
159
Iodine Nutrition
     By population (millions)
Deficient
262
49
467
284
25
304
1267
376
3034
Sufficient
311
757
68
3
1284
210
2
204
2839
Excess
54
29
127
0
0
0
0
0
210
Unknown
6
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
6
     By population, distribution (%)
Deficient
41
6
71
99
2
59
99
65
50
Sufficient
49
91
10
1
98
41
1
35
47
Excess
9
3
19
0
0
0
0
3
Unknown
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
     By number of countries
%
Deficient
25
6
9
14
2
9
6
13
84
53
Sufficient
18
18
4
1
1
10
1
19
72
45
Excess
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
3
2

 


 

BIBLIOGRAFIA ESSENZIALE

Buchberger W, Winkler R, Moser M, Rieger G. Influence of iodide on cataractogenesis in Emory mice. Ophthalmic Res 1991; 23 :303-8

Cocchi M, Venturi S. Iodide, antioxidant function and omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids: a new hypothesis of a biochemical cooperation? Progress in Nutrition 2000; 2 :15-19

Dai G, Levy O, Carrasco N. Cloning and characterization of the thyroid iodide transporter. Nature. 1996 Feb 1; 379 (6564):458-60.

Hak AE, Pols HA, Visser TJ, Drexhage HA, Hofman A, Witteman JC. Subclinical hypothyroidism is an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction in elderly women: the Rotterdam Study. Ann Intern Med. 2000;132:270-278.

Kahaly GJ. Cardiovascular and atherogenic aspects of subclinical hypothyroidism. Thyroid. 2000;10:665-679.

Farrell AP, Johansen JA . Reevaluation of regression of coronary arteriosclerotic lesions in repeat-spawning steelhead trout. Arteriosclerosis and Thrombosis, 1992 Vol 12, 1171-1175, by American Heart Association

Gothe S, Wang Z, Ng L, Kindblom JM, Barros AC, Ohlsson C, Vennstrom B, Forrest D. Mice devoid of all known thyroid hormone receptors are viable but exhibit disorders of the pituitary-thyroid axis, growth, and bone maturation. Genes Dev. 1999 May 15;13(10):1329-41.

Katamine S, Hoshino N, Totsuka K, Suzuki M.. Effects of the long-term feeding of high-iodine eggs on lipid
metabolism and thyroid function in rats. J Nutr Sci Vitaminol. 1985 ; 31:339-53

Kuepper FC, Schweigert N, Ar Gall E, Legendre J-M, Vilter H, Kloareg B. Iodine uptake in Laminariales involves extracellular, haloperoxidase-mediated oxidation of iodide. Planta 1998; 207 :163-171

Marani L, Venturi S, Masala R. Role of iodine in delayed immune response. sr J Med Sci. 1985 Oct;21(10):864.

Oziol L, Faure P, Vergely C, Rochette L, Artur Y, Chomard P, Chomard P. In vitro free radical scavenging capacity of thyroid hormones and structural analogues. J Endocrinol. 2001 Jul; 170 (1):197-206.

Pedersén M, Collén J, Abrahamson J, Ekdahl A. Production of halocarbons from seaweeds: an oxidative stress reaction? Sci Mar. 1996; 60 (Suppl. 1) :257-263

Tseng YL, Latham KR. Iodothyronines: oxidative deiodination by hemoglobin and inhibition of lipid peroxidation . Lipids 1984; 19 :96-102

Smanik PA, Liu Q, Furminger TL, Ryu K, Xing S, Mazzaferri EL, Jhiang SM. Cloning of the human sodium lodide symporter. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 1996 Sep 13;226(2):339-45.

Venturi S. Preliminari ad uno studio sui rapporti tra cancro gastrico e carenza alimentare iodica: prospettive specifiche di prevenzione. 1985; ed. USL n.1, Regione Marche; Novafeltria (PU).

Venturi S, Venturi M . Iodide, thyroid and stomach carcinogenesis: evolutionary story of a primitive antioxidant ? Europ J Endocrinol 1999; 140, 4 :371-2

Venturi S, Donati FM, Venturi A, Venturi M, Grossi L, Guidi A.Role of iodine in evolution and carcinogenesis of thyroid, breast and stomach. Adv Clin Path. 2000 Jan; 4(1):11-7

Venturi S, Donati FM, Venturi A, Venturi M. Environmental iodine deficiency: A challenge to the evolution of terrestrial life? Thyroid. 2000 Aug;10(8):727-9.

Venturi S. Is there a role for iodine in breast diseases?. The Breast,, 2001,10 :379-382

Venturi S, Grossi L, Marra GA, Venturi A, Venturi M. Iodine, Helicobacter pylori, Stomach Cancer & Evolution. European EPI-marker. 2003. Vol. 7, No. 2, April pag. 1-7

Virgili F, Canali R, Figus E, Vignolini F, Nobili F, Mengheri E. 1999. Intestinal damage induced by zinc deficiency is associated with enhanced CuZn superoxide dismutase activity in rats: effect of dexamethasone or thyroxine treatment. Free Radic Biol Med; 26 (9-10) 1194-201

Winkler R. Moser M. Alterations of antioxidant tissue defense enzymes and related metabolic parameters in streptozotocin diabetic rats: effect of iodine treatment. Wien Klin Wocheschr . 1992; 104 (14): 409-13.

Wolff J Transport of iodide and other anions in the thy-roid gland. Physiol Rev. 1964; 44:45-90.


 

Per bibliografia completa corrispondere con:

Dr. Sebastiano Venturi
-via Tre Genghe n. 3. 61016-PENNABILLI (Pesaro),
Tel : 0541-928205

[ Home ]